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TEACHING

CI 499:

ATTENTION,

LEARNING, &

TECHNOLOGY//

As the range and presence of technology increases in our world, more and more experiences are either mediated or interrupted by these technologies. Concerns about the effect of interruptions are coupled with enthusiasm for the potential of technology to radically alter the learning environment. This class examines research on the relationship between attention and learning, recent work on the effects of multitasking and the influence that using technology in classrooms has on students’ engagement and attention. Additionally, this class looks at arguments about how the changes in technology influences the speed and depth of thought, attention disorders and the use of technology and consider how the management of attention is a key tool for learners to develop.

For more information about this course, you can download and read the syllabus here.

Young children are often described as ‘digital natives’, and an ever-increasing number of digital toys, child-friendly computer devices and apps are being made available to support learning and development during the early years. However, there are questions about whether young children should use technology and whether the activities that are being replaced by technology are more appropriate to support development and learning.

In this course, theories of child development, such as behaviorism, constructivism, social constructivism, constructionism, will inform an analysis of current technologies that are marketed towards infants and pre-school children.

For more information about this course, you can download and read the syllabus here.

The purpose of this course is to examine the research on collaborative learning and consider what it has to say about using collaboration for instruction.  The beginning of the course focuses on theoretical questions about collaboration and collaborative learning, which provides a basis for later discussion of applications. We then look at a range of studies that propose ways of implementing and supporting collaborative learning. These studies range from work that focuses on the design of tasks and group composition to group roles and interaction behaviors. This course also examines the role of the teacher in a collaborative classroom.

For more information about this course, you can download and read the syllabus here.

This class reviews the literature on learning spaces, as well as the literature on how the environment shapes the learning experiences and opportunities of students both in classrooms and in informal learning spaces such as museums. A large focus of the course will be on observing, collecting data about, and designing learning spaces. Some class sessions include visits to different learning environments on campus such as other classroom spaces and museums. Students taking this course also collect data on the teaching and learning experience in the new classrooms in the College of Education to develop a greater understanding of what teachers and students care about in their learning environments. The course’s final project focuses on the design and justification of a classroom on campus that is scheduled to be redeveloped in the next year.

For more information about this course, you can download and read the syllabus here.

CI 519 class focuses on conducting research in classrooms and with children generally.

 

Topics will include:

  • Defining research questions.

  • Designing a study to answer your questions.

  • Understanding the validity and reliability trade-offs of classroom research, and how to make informed decisions about these.

  • Understanding limitations of different research studies (and how to read a research paper to identify them)

  • Relationship with teachers (as co-designers, collaborators, facilitators etc.)

  • Deciding between qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies.

This class fulfils a basic research requirement. For more information about this course, you can download and read the syllabus here.

The DETLA Capstone Project course is required for LES majors with a concentration in DELTA, but is open to any student with the consent of the instructor. During this course, teams of students will work with a teacher or other educator to identify a learning problem and develop and pilot test a solution for the teacher's classroom. The project culminates in an in-classroom test and final project presentations.

For more information about this course, you can download and read the syllabus here.

CI 424:

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

& TECHNOLOGY//

CI 507: 

COLLABORATIVE 

LEARNING & 

INSTRUCTION//

CI 499: 

DESIGNING

LEARNING  

SPACES//

CI 519: 

METHODS IN

CHILD STUDY//

CI 489:

DELTA CAPSTONE//